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Health State Life Table

Christos H Skiadas and Charilaos Skiadas 

Chaotic Modeling and Simulation (CMSIM) 4: 511-518, 2013

Exploring Sullivan's Health Status Index of Mortality and Morbidity 

http://www.cmsim.eu/papers_pdf/october_2013_papers/3_CMSIM-Journal_2013_Skiadas_4_511-518.pdf 

Exploring Sullivan's Health Status Index of Mortality and Morbidity

This tutorial presents the Health State Life Table. This is developed by expanding the classical life table for estimating the Life Expectancy with a second part for the simultanuous estimation of the Health State of a Population.

Demographic and Human Development Indicators (All 35 countries, PDF 9.5 Mb)

Click here to download Demographic and Health Indicators for the 193 Countries of WHO (pdf 0.5 Mb)

Download the Demographic and Human Development Indicators for 35 Countries below

Australia, Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, (PDF 4.5Mb)

Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway (PDF 5 Mb)

Poland, Portugal, Russia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, UK, USA (PDF 3.5 Mb)

Health State Life Table in PDF Format

From our first introduction of the Health State Function (see Janssen, J. and Skiadas, C. H., Dynamic Modelling of Life-Table Data. Applied Stochastic Models and Data Analysis, vol. 11, No 1, 35-49, 1995) by using the first exit time theory of a stochastic process from a barrier, it was evident that, this very difficult stochastic theory both from the theoretical and applied point of view, could not find a wide applicability. 

However, in the time course some delicate issues were resolved and especially inversion techniques (see C. H. Skiadas and C. Skiadas The Health State Function of a Population, Second Edition, 2013, www.cmsim.net ) resulting in the estimation of the Health State of a Population directly from the data sets without the need of a fitting a curve. Following this achievement we are able to estimate the Health State and many related statistics from the Life Tables in a similar table form thus enabling to formulate this Health State Life Table.

The Health State Life Table is introduced to close the gap between the classical Life Table used to estimate the Life Expectancy of a population and the new methods of estimating the Health State of the population from life table data along with the many related health statistics as are the Maximum Health State and the Age at the Maximum Health State, the Total Health State, the Age at Zero Health, the Expected Healthy Age and other Demographic Statistics as are the Loss of Healthy Life Years under Severe Disability causes (LHLY1), the Loss of Healthy Life Years under Severe and Moderate Disability causes (LHLY3) and the Loss of Healthy Life Years under Severe, Moderate and Light Disability causes (LHLY Total). Accordingly, the Healthy Life Expectancy under Severe Disability causes (HLEB1), the Healthy Life Expectancy under Severe and Moderate Disability causes (HLEB3) and the Healthy Life Expectancy under Severe, Moderate and Light Disability causes (HLEB Total) are estimated. 

The Health State Life Table is divided in five parts:
1. The data introduction and mortality calculation where the data are introduced either as population and death data (Px+Dx) or as mortality data (μx or qx).
2. The life expectancy part with the classical Life Expectancy (ex) estimation.
3. The Health State (Hx) estimation part. An important part of the health state life table for the quantitative estimation of the Health State of a Population.
4. The Healthy Life Expectancy part. In this part we estimate the Loss of Healthy Life Years by using the estimates from the Health State and then we estimate the Healthy Life Expectancy at birth.
5. The graph part providing important illustrations and especially for q(x), ln(qx), L(x), e(x), g(x), H(x) and x*H(x).

The Health State Life Table is given in Excel format and can dowloaded below. The example presented is for USA males the year 2000. The data are from the Human mortality database. Three methods of introducing data are possible.

1. By inserting both the Death (Dx) and the Population data (Px).

2. By inserting the Mortality data (mx)

3. By inserting the Mortality data (qx)

The number of Deaths (dx) for 100.000 is estimated along with the Surviorship (Lx), the sum Tx=S(Lx) and the Life Expectancy (ex) for all the age period.

In the Health State part of the Table first the Death Distribution (gx) is calculated from dx. Then the characteristic parameter kx is computed along with the maximum value of (kx) and the age at zero health is estimated. It follows the estimation of the Health State (Hx) of the population for every year of age along with the calculation of the Maximum Health State Level. The next step is the calculation of the Total Health State and the Expected Healthy Age.

Health State Life Table in Excel (simple)

Health State Life Table in Excel (Complete 23 Mb)

Health_State_Life_Table_Extended_Final
Health_State_Life_Table_Extended_Final1.jpg

Demographic and Human Development Indicators (9.5 Mb)

Publication_Introduction.jpg

The needed material to follow the tutorial can be found and downloaded below.
It includes data sets for four countries a simple model (mirror Gompertz) and an advanced SKI-6 parameter model.
Guidelines are included. More information during the presentation.

Deaths_Population_France_Males

Deaths_Population_Japan_Males

Deaths_Population_UK_Males

Deaths_Population_USA_Males

Mirror_Gompertz_model

SKI-6 parameter model

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